Managing Your Time

Time is the scarcest resource, and unless it is managed, nothing else can be managed.
-Dr. Peter Drucker, The Effective Executive

Many people find that the way to begin to gain control of their time is by discovering how their time is being spent. You accomplish this by keeping a time log from the time you wake up to the time you go to sleep, (or begin by logging your planning periods.) Design your time log so you can make notations every fifteen minutes. Within a week or two, you'll see where your time goes. As you examine the time log, look to see if time is being wasted on low priority tasks.Control of your time starts with planning. If you plan each day, there will always be time for the important things.


Benefits of Scheduling

  1. Prevents procrastination.
  2. Helps you stay up to date and avoid last minute cramming.
  3. Makes studying enjoyable.
  4. Provides balance and time for guilt-free leisure time.
  5. Keeps YOU in control of your priorities.
  6. Actually saves time by providing a guide for you to follow.


The Principles of Scheduling

  1. Use daylight hours.
  2. Study before a discussion class or one that has frequent pop quizzes.
  3. Study immediately after lecture class.
  4. Study at the same time every day.
  5. Plan enough time to study (at least one to two study hours for every class hour.)
  6. Space study periods (50 to 90 minutes of study and then take a 10-15 minute break.)
  7. List activities according to priorities.
  8. Study during your prime time, the time when you are most alert.
  9. Leave unscheduled time for flexibility.
  10. Analyze your use of time.

5 Steps to Preparing a Master Schedule

Master Schedule

 
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
7-8
             
8-9
             
9-10
             
10-11
             
11-12
             
12-1
             
1-2
             
2-3
             
3-4
             
4-5
             
5-6
             
6-7
             
7-8
             
8-9
             
9-10
             
10-11
             
11-12
             

References

www.dsea.org/teachingtips/

www.mtsu.edu/~studsk1/

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